Curriculum links

This page gives teachers an overview of the curriculum links you can make, whether in early childhood, primary or secondary settings. The sequence of activities is underpinned by contemporary educational thinking.

Depending on how much time you have, the sequence could be extended to offer a more comprehensive unit of work, yielding rich authentic learning experiences. If you’ve already programmed your year’s teaching and learning program, the Kids Co-designing Healthy Places sequence could also be completed as an integrated project. 

The sequence applies the main tenets of the health-promoting schools framework or whole-school approach as described in the Healthy Schools Achievement Program. This model encourages educators to connect classroom learning to the community and emphasises the role that physical and social environments have in shaping health and wellbeing.

All of the options provide authentic opportunities for students to be involved in inquiry-based learning and build health literacies.


Early childhood

We have aimed the original sequence at upper primary school children but it is easily adaptable for early childhood settings.


The curriculum map below explains how the KCDHP project aligns with:

The lesson plan provides a range of examples for how you could adapt the activity sequence’s three phases for younger children by using the organising concept ‘kids as health explorers’.

Primary

We’ve mapped explicit links to levels 5–6 of the Victorian Curriculum for each of the three phases of the Kids Co-designing Healthy Places learning sequence: learning about, auditing and co-designing healthy places.

You can download the curriculum map here.

When you look at the curriculum map, you will notice that the learning sequence connects with five different learning areas in the Victorian Curriculum:

  • Health and Physical Education (HPE) 
  • The Humanities: Geography, Civics and Citizenship
  • Design and Technologies 
  • English 
  • Mathematics

There are also links to one capability:

  • Personal and Social Capability

We have also mapped the model for levels 3–4 as you could easily adapt the task to suit younger kids. You can download the levels 3–4 curriculum map here.

The maps list relevant achievement standards and content descriptions, and provide specific examples of elaborations from the Victorian Curriculum to each of the three phases in the learning sequence. 

For instance, in Phase 1 – learning about healthy places – activities involve students comprehending, interpreting, describing and explaining healthy places. Compare this with Phase 3 – co-designing healthy places. This requires students to generate, develop and construct ideas from their own and others’ findings and data. 

Secondary

The Kids Co-designing Healthy Places model can be used across the secondary years in a variety of ways. Schools can decide how to align the Kids Co-designing Healthy Places program with the structure of their teaching and learning program. For example:

  • The program might be delivered within one subject area, such as Health Education or Geography, to achieve maximum focus on that area of the Victorian Curriculum.
  • Or it could be delivered across a number of subjects, with each learning area being responsible for specific aspects of the program. This requires teachers to liaise and work together to deliver content from across the Victorian Curriculum.
  • The program could be delivered as a stand-alone unit that integrates a range of learning areas from the Victorian Curriculum.

When you look at the levels 7–8 curriculum map, you will notice that the learning sequence connects with five different learning areas in the Victorian Curriculum:

  • Health and Physical Education (HPE)
  • The Humanities: Geography, Civics and Citizenship
  • Design and Technology
  • English 
  • Mathematics

It also connects with one capability:

  • Personal and Social Capability

The map lists relevant achievement standards and content descriptions and provides specific examples of elaborations from the curriculum to each of the three phases in the learning sequence. 

For instance, in Phase 1 – where kids learn about healthy places – activities involve students investigating, interpreting, and analysing what makes a place healthy. Compare this with Phase 3 – where kids are involved in co-designing healthy places. This requires students to collaborate among themselves and with others, plan design outcomes, and critique and explain ideas from their own and others’ findings and data.

There is scope for this project to also be taught at levels 9–10 particularly in HPE (Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities) and Geography. 

What’s next?

Head to the toolkit builder to set up the audit task and create a weblink you can share with students.